Melasma

Melasma is a common skin issue, that is a tan or dark skin discoloration.  It can be described as sharply demarcated blotchy, brown macules usually in a symmetric distribution over the cheeks and forehead and sometimes on the upper lip and neck. Melasma is thought to be caused by sun exposure, genetic predisposition, hormone changes, and skin irritation. Although it can affect anyone, melasma is particularly common in women, especially pregnant women and those who are taking oral or patch contraceptives or hormone replacement therapy medications. It can also be seen in women who are experiencing menopause.

 

Symptoms

Melasma causes patches of discoloration. The patches are darker than your usual skin color. It typically occurs on the face and is symmetrical, with matching marks on both sides of the face. Other areas of your body that are often exposed to sun can also develop melasma.

Brownish colored patches usually appear on the:

  • cheeks
  • forehead
  • bridge of the nose
  • chin

It can also occur on the neck and forearms. The skin discoloration doesn’t do any physical harm, but you may feel self-conscious about the way it looks. If you notice these symptoms of melasma, see your healthcare provider.

 

Different Types of Melasma

There are four types of pigmentation patterns that are diagnosed in melasma: epidermal, dermal, mixed, and an unnamed type found in dark-complexioned individuals. The epidermal type is identified by the presence of excess melanin in the superficial layers of skin. Dermal melasma is distinguished by the presence of melanophages (cells that ingest melanin) throughout the dermis. The mixed type includes both the epidermal and dermal type. In the fourth type, excess melanocytes are present in the skin of dark-skinned individuals.

Melasma is readily diagnosed by recognizing the typical appearance of brown skin patches on the face. Dermatologists often diagnose melasma by visually examining the skin. A black light or Wood's light can assist in diagnosing melasma, although is not essential for diagnosis. In most cases, mixed melasma is diagnosed, which means the discoloration is due to pigment in the dermis and epidermis. Rarely, a skin biopsy may be necessary to help exclude other causes of this local skin hyperpigmentation.

 

Treatment

Melasma may clear spontaneously without treatment. Our Melan in Skin Nourishing Serum is 100% plant-based serum covers all the bases and "may" aid in the restoration of pigment. A perfect blend of plant, fruit and vegetable oils that helps clear melasma.  It also provides sun protection and replenishes your skin with the vital nutrients it needs for healthy skin cell regeneration, all while acting as a primer to create a matte makeup look. This Is a MUST-HAVE to increase your melanin protection factor ( MPF).



Source references:

https://medical-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com/melasma

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Melasma

https://www.healthline.com/health/melasma

https://www.medicinenet.com/melasma/article.htm#how_do_health_care_professionals_diagnose_melasma

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